Beautiful butts in the loo! Ahem… The Louvre… Beautiful butts in the loo! Ahem… The Louvre…
Art influencing art!

Here we have one of the oldest sculptures in the world influencing modern art, both gorgeous works are in the same museum! Wha!?!?! Awesome….

The drawing on the left is Henry Moore’s “Two Seated Women" which was executed in 1944. The lovely lady on the left was made just a wee bit earlier in time, like a couple thousand years earlier…. 2600–2400 B.C.!

About Mr. Moore’s love of primitive art…

Moore’s sculptures in the twenties and the early thirties are perfect examples of deeply romantic English lyricism with a great feeling for landscape and natural forms. Whilst his early work remained firmly grounded in relatively figurative forms, Moore also rejected tradition, choosing for his inspiration not the classical figures of the Renaissance and the Graeco-Roman tradition but primitive models, as seen in the British Museum and the readily available information on non-western art that was fashionable at the time. One of Moore’s first sculptures to demonstrate his distinctive individual style was the 1929 Reclining Figure in brown Horton stone (LH 59), later sold to the Leeds City Art Gallery. 

About Ms. Cycladic mystery…

Despite much scholarly endeavour then, there is still great mystery surrounding these statues and perhaps this is part of their appeal. One of the problems with Cycladic art is that it is very much a victim of its own success. Appreciated by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore in the 20th century CE, a vogue for anything Cycladic arose which unfortunately resulted in the illegal traffic of looted goods from the Cyclades. The result is that many of the Cycladic art objects now in western museums have no provenance of any description, compounding the difficulties for scholars to ascertain their function in Cycladic culture. These objects are, nevertheless, part of the few tangible remains of a culture which no longer exists and without a form of writing the members of that culture are unable to explain for themselves the true significance of these objects and we are left to imagine the function and faces behind these enigmatic sculptures which continue to fascinate more than three millennia after their original manufacture. 

Info. via: 
Cycladic statue: http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/457/
Henry Moore: http://www.henry-moore.org/pg/archive/henry-moores-life/1926—1935

Images
Cycladic statue: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/255275
Henry Moore:
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/489606?rpp=60&pg=1&ft=Henry+Moore&pos=30 Art influencing art!

Here we have one of the oldest sculptures in the world influencing modern art, both gorgeous works are in the same museum! Wha!?!?! Awesome….

The drawing on the left is Henry Moore’s “Two Seated Women" which was executed in 1944. The lovely lady on the left was made just a wee bit earlier in time, like a couple thousand years earlier…. 2600–2400 B.C.!

About Mr. Moore’s love of primitive art…

Moore’s sculptures in the twenties and the early thirties are perfect examples of deeply romantic English lyricism with a great feeling for landscape and natural forms. Whilst his early work remained firmly grounded in relatively figurative forms, Moore also rejected tradition, choosing for his inspiration not the classical figures of the Renaissance and the Graeco-Roman tradition but primitive models, as seen in the British Museum and the readily available information on non-western art that was fashionable at the time. One of Moore’s first sculptures to demonstrate his distinctive individual style was the 1929 Reclining Figure in brown Horton stone (LH 59), later sold to the Leeds City Art Gallery. 

About Ms. Cycladic mystery…

Despite much scholarly endeavour then, there is still great mystery surrounding these statues and perhaps this is part of their appeal. One of the problems with Cycladic art is that it is very much a victim of its own success. Appreciated by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore in the 20th century CE, a vogue for anything Cycladic arose which unfortunately resulted in the illegal traffic of looted goods from the Cyclades. The result is that many of the Cycladic art objects now in western museums have no provenance of any description, compounding the difficulties for scholars to ascertain their function in Cycladic culture. These objects are, nevertheless, part of the few tangible remains of a culture which no longer exists and without a form of writing the members of that culture are unable to explain for themselves the true significance of these objects and we are left to imagine the function and faces behind these enigmatic sculptures which continue to fascinate more than three millennia after their original manufacture. 

Info. via: 
Cycladic statue: http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/457/
Henry Moore: http://www.henry-moore.org/pg/archive/henry-moores-life/1926—1935

Images
Cycladic statue: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/255275
Henry Moore:
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/489606?rpp=60&pg=1&ft=Henry+Moore&pos=30

Art influencing art!

Here we have one of the oldest sculptures in the world influencing modern art, both gorgeous works are in the same museum! Wha!?!?! Awesome….

The drawing on the left is Henry Moore’s “Two Seated Women" which was executed in 1944. The lovely lady on the left was made just a wee bit earlier in time, like a couple thousand years earlier…. 2600–2400 B.C.!

About Mr. Moore’s love of primitive art…

Moore’s sculptures in the twenties and the early thirties are perfect examples of deeply romantic English lyricism with a great feeling for landscape and natural forms. Whilst his early work remained firmly grounded in relatively figurative forms, Moore also rejected tradition, choosing for his inspiration not the classical figures of the Renaissance and the Graeco-Roman tradition but primitive models, as seen in the British Museum and the readily available information on non-western art that was fashionable at the time. One of Moore’s first sculptures to demonstrate his distinctive individual style was the 1929 Reclining Figure in brown Horton stone (LH 59), later sold to the Leeds City Art Gallery.

About Ms. Cycladic mystery…

Despite much scholarly endeavour then, there is still great mystery surrounding these statues and perhaps this is part of their appeal. One of the problems with Cycladic art is that it is very much a victim of its own success. Appreciated by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore in the 20th century CE, a vogue for anything Cycladic arose which unfortunately resulted in the illegal traffic of looted goods from the Cyclades. The result is that many of the Cycladic art objects now in western museums have no provenance of any description, compounding the difficulties for scholars to ascertain their function in Cycladic culture. These objects are, nevertheless, part of the few tangible remains of a culture which no longer exists and without a form of writing the members of that culture are unable to explain for themselves the true significance of these objects and we are left to imagine the function and faces behind these enigmatic sculptures which continue to fascinate more than three millennia after their original manufacture.

Info. via:
Cycladic statue: http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/457/
Henry Moore: http://www.henry-moore.org/pg/archive/henry-moores-life/1926—1935

Images
Cycladic statue: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/255275
Henry Moore:
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/489606?rpp=60&pg=1&ft=Henry+Moore&pos=30

Just posted a GIF (Taken with GifBoom)

Just posted a GIF (Taken with GifBoom)

We need a Museum Hack video like this. BADASS.

A Brief History of John Baldessari. Narrated by Tom Waits. 

This is a 17th century robotic drinking game. No joke

Imagine it’s 1620 and you’re at a super VIP soiree….it’s fancy and all but the music sucks and the drinks are weak. Your host needs to pick up the energy so they reach for this gadget, pop the stag’s head off and fill its hollow body with the strongest booze they can find. They then set it down, wind it up, and send it zigzagging across the table. It lands in front of you and you know that means it’s time to chug (it ALL). Rinse and repeat. PARTY SAVED

Link to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s page on the piece: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/

For more about our AWESOME museum adventures, check out www.MuseumHack.com

Something was in the water in the 15th century, people LOVED them a raunchy joke. This plate would have been used either to hold food (we’d like to imagine something super Medieval like a pig’s head) or as a water basin. Call it the equivalent of 15th century extreme Cracker Jack. 

It depicts a husband holding the tools his wife would typically use to spin wool by hand. He, however, is doing such a bad job that his saucy wife is beating his (bare) butt so hard that the hat is flying off of his head. This would have been hilariously satirical both because the process of hand spinning would have been considered outdated and because hubby is doing a ‘woman’s job’ and sucking at it big time. 

Check this work out in Gallery 307 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (between Medieval and the American Wing), nobody ever stops there and this plate needs some new friends. 

Link to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s page on the piece: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/

For more about our AWESOME museum adventures, check out www.MuseumHack.com 

www.MuseumHack.com

Check it out y’all! We’ve officially launched this awesome museum adventure business. Seriously good stuff, spread the museum love! 

LOVING this blog

LOVING this blog

uglyrenaissancebabies:

Don’t worry, guys, I was a Caesarean section baby, and this is actually totally accurate. 

(via discardingimages)

OMG WHOA

Even the BATHROOMS at the Metropolitan Museum of Art are tour-worthy. Here’s our tour of the BEST one at the museum. So fresh. So clean. 

Note: Old website
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